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" conference. looking at the 2012 election and rapid rise of online news and social media and how it came to change the way campaigns are covered and run for that matter. i'm joined by ben smith of buzzfeed.com, a popular site that aims to change the face of political reporting. good to see you. >> thanks for having me. >> a hugely impactful figure on twitter as well. here we are, we have come through really the first social media election of our time. >> absolutely. >> what did that mean? >> what i think it meant was there was a political conversation that used to happen on the bus, in tv studios and started to happen in blogs around 2008 and if you wanted somebody to see you attacked him, you would e-mail it to him to respond. this cycle what happened, there was a centralized stream on twitter, all of these things being said were being said in this very direct way and people saying them to each other and previously outside could jump into the conversation. >> it's a level of interactivity in political dialogue became bigger than anything the traditional media could do on its own. you ha
hearts that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. >> this week, the post-election rubio. >> i still wish i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. >> and where do we go from here? >> mr. president, we stand ready to work with you. >> the republicans take a look at their game plan. >> i think republicans have done a lousy job of reaching out to people of color. >> an amazing campaign. let me be clear. i did not bill that. you build that. >> also a look at ballot initiatives, including legalizing pot. >> this is the best day of my life. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> it was a long, anxious night for a lot of people in this town and across the nion,ut then the networks called ohio and you knew it was over. the president won 93% of african-americans, a 71% of hispanics, more women than romney. he won 52% of voters under 34. half the independent voters. 54% of those who make over $100,000 a year. first we will hear from the president. >> i believe we can lead this future together because we
forward. tonight, in this election you, the american people, reminded us that while our road has been hard, while our journey has been long, we have picked ourselves up. we have fought our way back, and we know, in our hearts, that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. whether you held an obama sign or a romney sign, you made your voice heard and you made a difference. >>> the tally. president obama 50%. 58 millian votes. mitt romney, 48%. 56 million votes. so much for the popular vote. the electoral vote. 270 needed to win. president obama 303, governor romney 206. still unassigned, 29, florida is conducting a recount. >>> was this election a mandate, a landslide, a rout, a speaker, a marginal win, what was it? >> it is a significant victory by the president of the united states by more than 2 million votes, john. i don't believe it is a mandate. >> why isn't a mandate if it is such a big win? >> a mandate for what? a mandate to work together, certainly the entire country wants that. but the real fire bell in the night on this election is for the republican party. the
>> fox news election alert. barack obama has been reelected the president of the united sta >>> i want to know what the election result mean for freedom. >> for freedom? i have no idea >> that is our show. >> it is finally over now we have four more years of barack obama up. what does that mean to me? freedom. in chicago the president's lugging supporters asked what does that mean for freedom? >> freedom? >> freedom? >> i have no idea. [laughter] >> freedom? freedom? [laughter] >> let's dance. most people had no clue what to do with the question. that is upsetting to me. the man who has taught me a lot about freedom david those. were you surprised? >> i am dumbfounded. i would not expect they would give the answers i would like but i thought they would have an answer. >> it is this what good government give me? free down is not part of that. >> there used to be dead counter culture left like the marijuana freedom doing your own thing even if they'd understand starting a business is also doing your own thing. it is disappointing they don't even big of a connection between the democ
for conservatives to start by confronting the fact that the 2012 election was a historic victory for the american left. probably the greatest since 1936. unlike 92, 96 or 2008, at the democratic national ticket did little to anything to obscure the nature and content of its agenda. it would be oath -- surprising if the obama did not view this as europeanizing the government. using judges and regulators to impose its will on subjects ranging from same-sex marriage in all 50 states to green curbing of the upsurge of fossil fuels through such methods as hydraulic fracturing. for darker the galling is the defeat of every republican challenger for the u.s. senate coupled with a democratic victory in 25 out of a possible 33 races. hanging on to the house by a slightly reduced margin will be a slightly reduced margin for those of us to vote for repeal of obama care and entitlement reform. republicans have now lost four out of the past six presidential elections, and five of the past six in terms of the popular vote. this followed three landslide victories in the era of ronald reagan that dominated the p
in the world. but how is this sexy? thanks again for joining us. mitt romney lost the election but he may have made history. here's why. his loss could go down as the last presidential campaign to bank on the white vote for a win. in a moment, evidence of why that is a losing strategy. let's get quickly to al cardenis and patrick millsap. first to you, al, are whites the new minority here in america, especially when it comes to elections? >> it will be soon. when ronald reagan, our gold standard, won in 1980, it was 87% of the vote. this year, it was 72% of the vote. it will be 68% of the vote in 2016. and by the 2020s, it will be the minority vote in america. >> i'm going to ask patrick the same question. patrick, what do you think? >> at first, we have an outreach problem. we are banking on vote that is we don't necessarily put in the bank and we are counting the votes that clearly aren't necessarily being there. we have to work on that. >> but my question, do you think whites are the new minority, especially when it comes to politics now? >> i don't want to agree with your premise of this a
democrats. our guest is fawn johnson. followed by a look of the role of money in the 2012 election. we are joined by kathy kiely. later, a discussion about tax rates and which tax cuts are expected to expire at the end of the year. lindy paul is our guest. "washington journal" host: [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> our guest is grover norquist. president of americans for tax reform. plans. our panel of journalists, steven sloan from "politico" and russell berman from "the hill." >> thank you for being here. i want to talk about your interpretation of the election and what it means for the direction of tax policy. >> we had a split decision appeared the president won by two points. he won by 7.2 years ago against a war hero. he had 9 million fewer votes. he is a lame duck now. he said he was interested in raising taxes a year from now on anyone. his physician from four years -- position from four years ago was that they would not raise taxes on anyone. he was very clear and no taxes if you made less t
a second term upgrade? will the hard right in the house give thumbs down for the re-elected president, will they risk the fiscal abyss to keep their ties to the tea party? and finally, this is my country. even mitt romney was echoing that cry from the anti-obama crowd, pledging to take our country back. but that is deep in the past. no matter how hard they want it, america's fewer you to -- future just won't look like the early 1950's. hi, i'm chris matthews. welcome to the show. with us today, the washington post bob woodward. "the washington post" kathleen parker, "the new york times" d helen cooper. first up. barack obama's place in american presidential history was upgrated tuesday with his convincing sweeping re-election by an entirely new american elect rat. -- electorate. >> we are greater than the sum of our individual ambitions and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. we are and forever will be the united states of america. and together, with your help and god's grace, we will continue our journey forward. chris: bob, here we are five days later. i'
news election alert. barack obama has been reelected the president of the united states. >> what does that mean for freedom? >> i have no idea. >> that is our show. >> it is finally over now we have four more years of barack obama up. what does that mean to me? freedom. in chicago the president's lugging supporters asked what does that mean for freedom? >> freedom? >> freedom? >> i have no idea. [laughter] >> freedom? freedom? [laughter] >> let's dance. most people had no clue what to do with the question. that is upsetting to me. the man who has taught me a lot about freedom david those. were you surprised? >> i adumbfounded. i would not expect they would give the answers i would like but i thought they would have an answer. >> it is this what good government give me? free down is not part of that. >> there used to be dead counter culture left like the marijuana freedom doing your own thing even if they'd understand starting a business is also doing your own thing. it is disappointing they don't even big of a connection between the democratic election and the impact on freedom. >> th
congressman elect jeffreys, a democrat from brooklyn. a professor at the school for social network. author of unintended consequences. a former partner at bain capital and molly, a reporter for a magazine who did phenomenal work. tuesday's election brought us not just a second term for president obama but a new congress as well. there are two ways to look at the make up of the congress. one is the endorsement of the status quo. asking the two to work together as house speaker john boehner put it the day after the election. >> the american people have spoken. they reelected president obama. they have again reelected a republican majority in the house of representatives. if there's a mandate in yesterday's results, it's a mandate for us to find a way to work together on the solutions to the challenges we all face as a nation. >> the other way to interpret the results is to see them as a resounding liberal governance. a larger and apparently more democratic majority in the senate. it's how harry reid framed the results. >> we had an overwhelming re-election of the president. we picked up seat
. let me start with this. the re-elected president did it today. he said what he's going to do. how he's going to lead. he's going to do it as a world leader entering into negotiations with conditions. those preconditions are clear. a tape back from the bush tax cuts from the top. this is it. it means people know we have a president now who's ready to stand his ground, for jobs, for growth, but not the bush/romney way. no more trickle down now that the people of this country have sent their message from the top up. he will be a democratic president. he will be fair on taxes. he will use those taxes to rebuild this country and educate it up to the tough competition we face in this 21st century. rock solid he is. backed again by a majority of the american people. indeed, re-elected as the only second democrat since the civil war with two majority elections. the other, of course, is fdr. with an updated mandate he is back. some ready to deal, others hiding in their bunkers, waiting for something, anything to save them from the terrifying sight of the 21st century. i'm joined by dee dee my
>>> coming up, religion's role in the election. also a lucky severson story on helping wounded veterans overcome what many of them say they greatly miss, feeling needed. >> wcome, i'bob erney. it's good to have you with us. like many others in the nation, faith groups are assessing the impact of this week's election. according to exit polls, president obama won a slight majority of catholic voters overall, thanks largely to strong support from latino catholics. mitt romney won the white catholic vote by an almost 20-point margin. almost 80% of evangelicals who voted voted for romney. black protestants went overwhelmingly for obama, as did the vast majority of jews. but the biggest share of obama's faith coalition was voters who say they aren't affiliated with any religion. steve schneck was co-chair of catholics for obama. he says while issues like abortion, religious liberty and gay marriage were important, in the end, it was the economy that tipped the scale for the president. >> all of these religious issues, while they are important to religious voters, i think, even among
the election, the counting is finally over in florida. more than a decade after bush versus gore, a lot of folks are wondering what's the matter with the sunshine state. >>> power struggle. nearly two weeks since the superstorm, tensions boil over as hundreds of thousands remain without power. >>> day of honor for the brave young girl who inspired millions with her message of empowerment. a worldwide show of support for malala. >>> and lessons from lincoln. >> by the people, for the people. >> as our nation's 16th president hits the big screen. >>> good evening. we have learned a great deal more today about what led to yesterday's abrupt resignation of cia director david petraeus. the highly decorated retired general and former war commander stepped down after admitting to an extramarital affair exposed during the course of an fbi investigation. tonight we have learned petraeus was not at all the subject of the probe, but rather it was his biographer paula broadwell who first came to the attention of investigators, leading to an unexpected discovery. law enforcement and multiple u.s. of
from "the hill" >> thank you for being here. i want to talk about your interpretation of the election and what it means for the direction of tax policy. >> we had a split decision appeared the president won by two points. he won by 7.2 years ago against a war hero. he and 9 million fewer votes. he is a lame duck now. he said he was interested in raising taxes a year from now on anyone. his physician from four years ago was that they would not raise taxes on anyone. he was very clear and no taxes if you made less than $250,000. this year august 8, he started with a new framework. my plan is that i will not raise taxes on anyone who earns less than $250,000 a year. his only promising -- he is only promising not to raise income taxes. this is not include energy taxes. is only promising to protect income taxes for one year. at the end of the year, he has promised the middle-class nothing. you have one guy says he will raise taxes on the rich people to get you ready for everybody else picking up. the republican majority in the house was elected not for four years before the next 10. the de
, the post-election rubio. ablestill wish had been to f ffill your hopes to lead the country in aa different directction. >> and where do weo from here? >> mr. p president, we stand rey to work with you. >> the republicans take a look at their game plan. >> i think republicans have done toousy job of reaching out people of color. >> an amazing campaign. let me be clear. i did not bill that. -- billetttt that. you build that. >> also a lo at b ballot initiatives, including legalizing pot. mythis is the best day ofof life. captned by th national capaptioning institute --www.ncicap.org--rg >> it t was a long, anxious nigt for a lot of people in thihis town and across the nation, but then the networks called ohio and you knew it was over. the president n 93% o african-americans, a 71% of thannics, more women romney. 73% of asian-americans. 60% of voters 18 to 29. he won 52% of voters under 34. 4234. half the independent voters.s. overf those who me $100,000 a year. first we will ar from the president. thi i believe we e can le arere together because we politicssided as our suggest. we are not as
project red campaign. covered at 6:00 p.m. eastern. about voterk demographics in this year's election as a part of the national journal's day after the election conference. from washington, this is 35 minutes. >> it if you wanted to study predicate to see how this is a change in american politics, you could not have done a better than last night which i think we will look back at a political but also social and cultural milestone when they look in the mirror and says we are a different place than we used to be. we have a terrific panel. we will look at the implications of this, the two parties, for our economy, and for the society, but i want to start with three numbers that seemed to encapsulate the elections. 80, 39, 28. barack obama 180% of the combined the the minority voters, which -- barack obama won 80% of the combined minority voters. mitt romney, in losing, have the best showing among white male voters. will delve into this from every possible angle, but let me start with you, dan. let's talk about your thoughts about the implications of these results, both for the republican
that already we know some of the usual suspects even days after the election, the get out the vote effort on the democratic side was, appears to have been a master piece that will probably have impact on national elections going into the future. republicans have a lot to learn there. and there have been demographic changes in america. at the end of the day, i think my surprise about the election was that it was not so close in a way everybody was thinking we'd be up until four in the morning or counting ohio votes for two weeks. that didn't happen. this was a solid win for the president and i think the republican party has much to think about here going into the future. >> paul: thinking is always good. and maybe a step back and give at least some time to think. you wrote in the column, the republicans don't need to change their fundamental principles, belief in small government and so on, but maybe the way they present the principles. >> the way, the way they -- the way the party goes forward sometimes, it is the way -- is the way that unnecessarily, i think, occasionally turns people of
several presidents. >>> then, what happens when you mix big data and a presidential election? the results are fascinating and a little scary. it might well be the future of politics in america. >>> also, sea barriers, wetlands, futuristic construction materials. what is the answer to climate change and how can we all adapt to this new normal of hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods? i'll talk to jeffrey sachs and "time" magazine's brian walsh. >>> and why is there such an antiqued way of voting? i'll take a look. but first here's my take. growing up in the india in the 1960s and '70s, ales thought of america as the future. it was the place where the newest technology, the best gadgets, the latest fads seemed to originate. seemingly exotic political causes, women's liberation, gay rights, ageism, always seemed to get their start on the streets of the united states orthopedic in the courts and legislatures. for me, tuesday's election brought back that sense of america as the future. the presidential race has been discussed as one that was about nothing with no message or mandate, but i don't th
in this coming week that people need to know about? >> the republicans will have their leadership elections. we are expecting that john boehner will remain the speaker and erick kcantor will be the number two. there is not any major legislation on the floor of the house that we are expecting. >> the president is speaking again on wednesday on this and other issues. >> and using his post as the election pulpit to start the process. >> absolutely. >> a thank you for being here. an interesting couple weeks ahead for us to watch. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> watched grover norquist again at 6:00 p.m. eastern here on c- span. and about 30 minutes, president obama will participate in the presidential ceremony at the tomb of the unknowns. we will bring you live coverage here on c-span. while we wait, here's a look at the presidential election and congress from this morning's "washington journal." don >> he is still resolute in the face of defeat. >> not to see you. sometimes you win. sometimes you lose. >> this is t
tuesday elections. then the president obama obama and speaker bainer and then the polling during the 2012 presidential campaign. >> tomorrow president obama will be at arlington national cemetery to participate in the ceremony at the tom of the unknown and a remembrance ceremony. live coverage begins at 11:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> 2013 should be the year we solve our debt reform. i'm proposing we avert the fiscal cliff and 2013 is finally the year our government comes to grips with the problems that are facing us. >> i'm open to compromise and new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenge. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i'm not going to ask students and seniors and middle class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me aren't asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the new elected congress starts in january but the congress has to do work in a lame duck session and they have to work on the federal deficit raising the debt ceiling and by how much and planned cuts to domestic and military spending also known as sequestration. live c
the fiscal cliff. the election celebration is short-lived. a surprise resignation by cia director david petraeus comes days before congressional hearings over the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. we'll get reaction this morning from capitol hill and the very latest reporting on this developing story from our chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell, who broke the story friday afternoon. also the president and republicans get set to negotiate new taxes and spending cuts. is a breakthrough possible? >> i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. we've debated over and over again. and on tuesday night we found out that the majority of americans agree with my approach. >> mr. president, this is your moment. we're ready to be led. not as democrats or republicans but as americans. now, we want you to lead. >> where does it all go from sneer we'll ask democratic senator from new york chuck schumer and republican senator from oklahoma tom coburn. also we check in with cnbc's jim cramer, hear about the economic stakes should washington fail to avert fiscal disaster by the
involved, a scandal unfolding on election day. we'll bring you the details on the affair that brought down the most powerful spy chief in america. >>> this time overseas, the bbc chief resigns amidst false allegations. we'll have a live report. >>> they're our fathers, our mothers, our sons, and daughters. this veterans day we honor the heroes that fight for america's freedom. it is sunday, november 11. good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> we start with new details that led to the resignation of general petraeus. a timeline has now come into focus as well as a new investigation that has brought this to light. >> we now know from a u.s. official that it was a complaint from paula broadwell was sending harassing e-mails to another woman close to the cia director that prompted the fbi to investigate. also we know that the investigation led to the discovery of e-mails between broadwell and petraeus that indicated the affair. now, that second woman hasn't been identified, and the official we spoke with didn't know the nature of that woman's relations
not factor into tuesday's election. between day, everyone. welcome to weekends with alex whitt. we begin with new details on what precipitated the end of the storied military career. we now know what started an fbi investigation that ended in general petraeus' abrupt resignation. it all started with complaints to the fbi about harassing e-mails sent from this woman, paula broadwell, to the another unnamed woman. petraeus was not the focus of investigators, but that led them to other e-mails between petraeus and broadwell which officials tell nbc news were indicative of an extramarital affair. the general admitted to an extramarital affair in his resignation letter. meanwhile we're now hearing from petraeus' former spokesperson. he talked to kristen welker. she's in washington with more. >> i interviewed steven boylan by phone saturday. he called petraeus a mentor and friend. boylan says he's stunned by the news about his former boss. in the meantime, new details are emerging about how this all came to light. according to multiple sources, the down fall of general david petraeus all start
the agenda, the day after being elected the nice time. is the republican leadership going to play ball with him this time? >> there's no doubt the president is in the driver's seat, and he hold the cards and leverage, and conservatives don't have much from which they can negotiate. i don't know if the speaker of the house has the vote to give the president what he wants, which is tax increases on high income earners, but they will have to take the vote to show one way or the other. i think there is some sort of patchy deal put together at the last minute. i think house republicans can work with the president. but on other issues going forward, if the white house shows leadership, they've been disengaged on this issue until now, so it will be a welcomed change to see the white house get involved. >> it seems the way the republican base is narrowed, they don't have that much left besides the resistance to tax cuts in terms of securing that base. so if they were to yield on that one core issue, they would be an even more trouble than they are this week. and if they don't yield, then i don
>>> i have been warning you about it for months. now that the election is over, the fiscal cliff is finally getting some love. it's an economic storm of our own making that could trigger another recession and kill up to a million jobs next year if congress and the president don't act. i'm ali velshi. this is "your money." the elections are over. the american people have spoken. now it's time for washington to get to work. >> you elected us to focus on your jobs, not ours. >> that's because nothing is more important to our economic recovery than creating jobs. president obama says he'll add 12 million jobs over the next four years. but for his math to work, the pace of economic growth needs to pick up. with a crisis in europe and a slowdown in asia, an economic storm beyond our control stands ready to batter our shores. still, two years of consistent job growth prove we are heading in the right direction, but the fiscal cliff is one storm that will be of our own making unless washington acts. $7 trillion in across-the-board tax hikes and spending cuts over the next decade mandated
television provider. >> now, a discussion on the impact of tuesday's election from the u.s. senate. this is about 45 pence. -- this is about 45 minutes. host: ira shapiro is the author of "the last great senate." he is here to talk to was about the issues facing the senate coming up in the next edition of the senate. welcome to the program. guest: is good to be here. host: tell us a bit about the book. the title, the last great senate. what was it about the folks who were in that senate, the class of '62? who were the big guys in that class and what made them part of the last great senate? guest: i said in the book that america had a great senate from the early 1960's through 1980, a group of people who were focused on the national interests and were in the forefront of every issue facing the country. it is the senate of hubert humphrey, howard baker, robert and ted kennedy, robert dole and many others. they were an unusual group and they were triggered, in my estimation, by their war experience, the need for dealing with the cold war, and a progressive impulse that focused on some
be elected president and i was wrong so were most of the conservative observers and comment ators. let's be clear it was not the choice i was hoping for, but you know what, we did it without blood shed and bullets and people with boots and badges dragging us in the streets. hand ringing begins as republicans complain about the campaign or mitt romney himself. romny earned the primary and he and his campaign team gave it all they had. i don't agree that the obama message of bigger government and more taxes won. it was not an election of message. but the machinery to get out the votes for president obama and it was a masterful and methodical effort. >> as i listen to fellow television and radio talk show host or read the opinion colupes of those who excoreated romney. if you were not critical about mitt romney the day before the election, don't be critical and a phony the day after. the loudest critics were the people who never once put their own names on a ballot for anything some have a perfect insight of how to run a campaign and be a candidate. i sure hope they will give us all of th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 225 (some duplicates have been removed)